Sunday, March 29, 2015

St Mary's Haughton Green Revisited


Following on from my earlier post featuring St Mary's, Haughton Green I've been back and taken some more photographs.


The Church of St Mary the Virgin, Meadow Lane, Haughton Green, Lancashire, UK is of timber frame construction and was built in 1874/6, the architects being the brothers James Medland and Henry Taylor of Manchester. The design was inspired by the nearby Church of St Lawrence in Denton.


This shows the south side of the church viewed from Meadow Lane.


On the wall next to the rear door is a Millennium sundial.


The lychgate is also by James Medland and Henry Taylor. The slated roof is supported by a timber frame that, in turn, rests on stone walls. The two posts rise from, and are braced to, sole plates attached to the walls. The upper parts of the posts are braced to tie-beam trusses on each side and the eaves and verges overhang the roof trusses. The timber gates are hung on iron hinges.


Further information on the history of the church can be found on the PittDixon website whilst current information can be found on the Church website.

A contribution to Inspired Sundays and Whimsical Windows, Delirious Doors.

Sunday, March 08, 2015

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Meadow Lane, Haughton Green

Photograph © Gerald England

Following up on my earlier post about Haughton Green, the Church of St Mary the Virgin is of timber frame construction and was built in 1874/6, the architects being the brothers James Medland and Henry Taylor of Manchester. The design was inspired by the nearby Church of St Lawrence in Denton. The foundation stone was laid by its benefactor, James Walton, on Saturday, 11 April 1874 and the church was consecrated on Saturday, 25 March 1876. More information can be found on the PittDixon site. The church is Grade II listed.

The lychgate is also by James Medland and Henry Taylor. The slated roof is supported by a timber frame that, in turn, rests on stone walls. The two posts rise from, and are braced to, sole plates attached to the walls. The upper parts of the posts are braced to tie-beam trusses on each side and the eaves and verges overhang the roof trusses. The timber gates are hung on iron hinges. It too is Grade II listed.

For current activity visit the Church website.

A contribution to Inspired Sundays.

Friday, March 06, 2015

Hail on Hyde Road


The A57 at Crown Point, Denton. On the right is the entrance to Morrison's supermarket. The fence separating the pavement from the busy road is reflected in the window of the Quicksilver fireworks shop. A shower of hail is just falling but failing to stick.

A contribution to
Good Fences;
Skywatch Friday;
Weekend Reflections;
Scenic Weekends

Wednesday, March 04, 2015

ABC Wednesday:
H is for Haughton Green


Haughton Green is an ancient locality in South-east Lancashire. In 1894 it merged with neighbouring Denton.


Originally a rural area, with most of its built up areas along the main roads and in the old village, it became more built up when the Manchester (Beswick) overspill estate was located here in the late 50s behind existing housing on Two Trees Lane. There was also building of new middle class housing in and around the original village at the same time. This increased its size significantly as housing now extended down into the valley and next to wooded areas.


I first posted some photos of Haughton Green here in September 2009.

A contribution to ABC Wednesday and signs, signs.

Monday, February 16, 2015

Street Art in Manchester by Ruby Heart


The latest street art to decorate the former toilets in Stevenson Square, Manchester is by Leeds based artist Ruby Heart.

A contribution to Monday Murals.



Saturday, February 07, 2015

Window shopping in St Annes

© Gerald England

A man with two dogs outside a charity shop on Wood Street, St Anne's on the Sea.

A notice warns about wheel-clamping operations.

A contribution to
Saturday Critters;
Weekend Reflections;
Camera Critters;
Shadow Shot Sunday.

Tuesday, February 03, 2015

The historic Manchester Woolworth's site.

photograph © 2015, Gerald England.

The former Woolworths Manchester store on the corner of Piccadilly and Oldham Street was for a long time Noble's Amusements but is now a Travelodge with a Morrisons Local store, Nando's and Zizzi also occupying the ground floor. Buses for Ashton under Lyne leave from outside.


Creative Commons Licence [Some Rights Reserved]   © Copyright David Dixon and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The Woolworth's department store at the corner of Oldham Street and Piccadilly in Manchester, photographed a few days after the disastrous fire of 8th May 1979 which killed 10 people and left a further 47 needing hospital treatment.

The store comprised six floors along with two basement levels and at the time was said to be the largest Woolworth store in Europe. Crucially, the store had no sprinkler system fitted. It is believed that the fire was started by a damaged electrical cable that had furniture stacked in front of it.

The disaster led to a major shake-up in UK fire laws after it was revealed that polyurethane foam fillings in furniture at the store made the situation much worse. The foam would burn rapidly, producing large amounts of thick dense smoke which would have soon obscured the exit signs. This would have led to confusion and, together with the irritants in the smoke affecting people’s vision and causing breathing difficulties, would have hindered any escape. The changes in legislation are believed to have saved thousands of lives since.

At the time, on 8 May 1979, the Woolworth store blaze was the city's worst fire disaster since World War II.

Read the Fire Service report on the fire and the BBC News report.

A contribution to Our World Tuesday.

Saturday, January 24, 2015

Three men and a dog


Looking through some old photographs from 2007 I came across this scene taken on Lord Street, Southport, Lancashire.

A contribution to Scenic Weekends;
Saturday Critters;
Camera Critters;
Blue Monday.